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Featured Anthologies for February 

Give them love and laugher with

 

The New Oxford Book of Romantic Period Verse

Humor Writers from the New Yorker

 
 

and

Disquiet, Please!: More Humor Writing from The New Yorker

The poets whom we call the Romantics--Wordsworth, Coleridge, Burns, Blake, Byron, Shelley, and Keats--belonged to an age in which many other kinds of poetry written and published as well. In this new volume, Jerome McGann explores the full range of verse that was published in Britain between the years of 1785-1832, one of the most fertile periods for English writing. Selections from all the major and minor Romantic poets are included, as well as important political and satiric verse of the period, "sentimental" verse, regional and dialect verse, and verse in translation. Organizing the material by date of first appearance, and not by author grouping, McGann calls attention to the historical and cultural contexts in which the poetry is embedded. Another important feature of the volume is the space devoted to woman poets who include Felica Dorothea Hemans, Ann Yearsley, Laeticia Elizabeth Landon, and Mary Tighe, all distinguished writers who were previously given short shrift.
A stimulating volume from one of the most important periods in English literature, The New Oxford Book of Romantic Period Verse offers a new context in which to examine classic works of Romantic poetry.

 

 

 

Valentine's Day at Buy.com!

The New Yorker is, of course, a bastion of superb essays, influential investigative journalism, and insightful arts criticism. But for eighty years, it’s also been a hoot. In fact, when Harold Ross founded the legendary magazine in 1925, he called it “a comic weekly,” and while it has grown into much more, it has also remained true to its original mission. Now an uproarious sampling of its funny writings can be found in a hilarious new collection, Disquiet, Please!. As satirical and witty, misanthropic and menacing, as the first, Fierce Pajamas. From the 1920s onward–but with a special focus on the latest generation–here are the humorists who set the pace and stirred the pot, pulled the leg and pinched the behind of America.

S. J. Perelman unearths the furious letters of a foreign correspondent in India to the laundry he insists on using in Paris (“Who charges six francs to wash a cummerbund?!”). Woody Allen recalls the “Whore of Mensa,” who excites her customers by reading Proust (or, if you want, two girls will explain Noam Chomsky). Steve Martin’s pill bottle warns us of side effects ranging from hair that smells of burning tires to teeth receiving radio broadcasts. Andy Borowitz provides his version of theater-lobby notices (“In Act III, there is full frontal nudity, but not involving the actor you would like to see naked”). David Owen’s rules for dating his ex-wife start out magnanimous and swiftly disintegrate into sarcasm, self-loathing, and rage, and Noah Baumbach unfolds a history of his last relationship in the form of Zagat reviews.

Meanwhile, off in a remote “willage” in Normandy, David Sedaris is drowning a mouse (“This was for the best, whether the mouse realized it or not”).

Plus asides, fancies, rebukes, and musings from Patty Marx, Calvin Trillin, Bruce McCall, Garrison Keillor, Veronica Geng, Ian Frazier, Roy Blount, Jr., and many others.

If laughter is the best medicine, Disquiet, Please is truly a wonder drug.