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humor books, gift books, humor, fun books, funny books, humor anthologies

Humor Anthologies

  When Harold Ross founded The New Yorker in 1925, he called it a “comic weekly.” And although it has become much more than that, it has remained true in its irreverent heart to the founder’s description, publishing the most illustrious literary humorists in the modern era—among them Robert Benchley, Dorothy Parker, Groucho Marx, James Thurber, S. J. Perelman, Mike Nichols, Woody Allen, Calvin Trillin, Garrison Keillor, Ian Frazier, Roy Blount, Jr., Steve Martin, and Christopher Buckley. Fierce Pajamas is a treasury of laughter from the magazine W. H. Auden called the “best comic magazine in existence.”

 

   
  An inspiring collection of humor writing from World War II, edited and introduced by one of America's most respected broadcast journalists. War is hell, but it can also be hilarious. As America rediscovers World War II in such movies as Saving Private Ryan, it's clear that much of the tragedy that came out of that conflict was made bearable by generous doses of humor from all fronts -- at home, in Europe, and in the Pacific. Now, inspired by a ubiquitous piece of graffiti that U.S. servicemen left behind during World War II, Emmy Award-winning television journalist Charles Osgood has collected an assortment of classic stories and comic tales that celebrate the good humor that buoyed American spirits throughout the world. From the best of Stars and Stripes magazine to classic lines from the immortal Mister Roberts, this treasury includes original contributions, comic memoir essays from well-known veterans, and an insightful introductory essay by Osgood himself. A wonderful compilation of historically significant writing, as well as an uplifting celebration of America's indomitable spirit, this treasury of wit and humor is a unique addition to the libraries of World War II enthusiasts, veterans, and anyone who finds it impossible to resist a good laugh.
 
Seriously Funny Writing By Today's Most Celebrated Authors


At last, a premier showcase of fifty-four great literary humorists and masters of the journalistic jab, the social spoof, the parodic proof, the satire, the tirade, and the send-up. Here are those "last laughs" and "wit's end" pieces everyone turns to first but then loses in back issues of favorite magazines and newspapers, including:


Merrill Markoeon Networking with angels
Garry Trudeau on re-retranslating Madonna
David Sedaris on reviewing school Christmas Plays
John Updike on cross-dressing with J. Edgar Hoover



Also included are riotous contributions from Henry Alford, Jon Stewart, and David Ives, as well as millennial maxims by Mark O'Donnell, gardening advice by Mertensia Corydalis, and highlights from Randy Cohen's savvy "News Quiz."

Brought to you by The Thurber House
 
More Seriously Funny Writing From American's Most Trusted Humor Anthology

Witty, wise, and just plain wonderful, the inaugural volume of this biennial, Mirth of a Nation, ensured a place for the best contemporary humor writing in the country. And with this second treasury, Michael J. Rosen has once again assembled a triumphant salute to one of America's greatest assets: its sense of humor. More than five dozen acclaimed authors showcase their hilariously inventive works, including Paul Rudnick, Henry Alford, Susan McCarthy, Media Person Lewis Grossberger, Ian Frazier, Richard Bausch, Amy Krouse Rosenthal, Nell Scovell, Andy Borowitz, and Ben Greenman -- just to mention a handful so that the other contributors can justify their feelings that the world slights them.

But there's more! More Mirth of a Nation includes scads of Unnatural Histories from Randy Cohen, Will Durst's "Top Top-100 Lists" (including the top 100 colors, foods, and body parts), and three unabridged (albeit rather short) chapbooks:

David Bader's "How to Meditate Faster" (Enlightenment for those who keep asking, "Are we done yet?")

Matt Neuman's "49 Simple Things You Can Do to Save the Earth" (for instance, "Make your own honey" and "Share your shower.")

Francis Heaney's "Holy Tango of Poetry" (which answers the question, "What if poets wrote poems whose titles were anagrams of their names, i.e., 'Toilets,' by T. S. Eliot?")

And there's still more: "The Periodic Table of Rejected Elements," meaningless fables, Van Gogh's Etch A Sketch drawings, a Zagat's survey of existence, an international baby-naming encyclopedia, Aristotle's long-lost treatise "On Baseball," and an unhealthy selection of letters from Dr. Science's mailbag. And that's just for starters! Just remember, as one reviewer wrote of the first volume, "Don't drink milk while reading."

  A collection from the clever young writers that bring us the McSweeney's literary journal and Web site, and co-edited by their leader, Dave Eggers, is funny from the first page. And by "first page," we mean the table contents. Of course not every essay, list, and swatch of dialogue are created equal, but the collection has many tasty morsels that are well worth a read, a read to friends, and then a re-read, after a decent interval has elapsed.Most appealing in the book's starting lineup is J.M. Tyree's "On the Implausibility of the Death Star's Trash Compactor." Humorous as well as thought-provoking, this essay makes the perfect amuse bouche for what is arguably the collection's main course of hilarity, "Fire: the Next Sharp Stick?", "Candle Party," and "Unused Audio Commentary by Howard Zinn and Noam Chomsky, Recorded Summer 2002, for the Lord of the Rings: Fellowship of the Ring DVD (Platinum Series Extended Version), Part One," all to be found in the early middle. Though a familiarity with candle parties, Howard Zinn, sharp sticks, and other topics satirized in this book is helpful, it's not necessarily required for understanding the jokes. The biggest risk here is binge-reading, as you may exchange audible laughter for the feeling that you are being force-fed an ice cream sundae. If you pace yourself--say no more than four to six pieces at a time--you should have the energy for the final third, including the funny list marathon at the end. Or save a few portions for later when you are really starving for a good laugh. --Leah Weathersby
  As Oscar Levant said many years ago, "A pun is the lowest form of wit, especially if you didn't think of it first." In this lively collection you'll find a hilarious abundance of pun-ishment for the millions who can't resist giving a word or phrase a twist... and ammunition for many occasions from movie, TV and theatre wags; from the wits of Wall Street and Washington... the gems from poets and pundits and some of the bottom-of-the-barrel crumbs! Golf is like taxes. You drive hard to get to the green and wind up in the hole.

A monastery in financial trouble decided to go into the fish-and-chips industry to raise revenues. One night a customer knocked on the door and a monk answered. "Are you the fishfriar?" the customer asked. "No," the robed figurereplied, "I'm the chipmonk."

The book also contains a PUNdix, a PUNabridged dictionary and a collection of the best... and worst... jokes in the world!
  humor books, gift books, humor, fun books, funny books, humor anthologies

 

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