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Awesome Endings
By: Lea Schizas


 

 
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*This book became a best seller within

four weeks of its release!

As a new writer, I wanted to write short stories. I scoured the bookshops, but couldn’t find anything to teach me how to write them. I read gazillions of short stories and bought a ton of books on writing, but still couldn’t find anything specifically geared toward writing short stories.

It was a hard slog; without even a little bit of guidance, I felt like I was drowning. Even today, there is virtually nothing available that focuses totally on short story writing.

After earning more than $500 on the sale of just one story, I decided to write the book that I needed back in those early days.  Click Here! for Think Outside the Square: Writing Publishable (Short) Stories”

–An interactive workshop for writers–


Bungee jumping, sky diving, secret mission, Indy 500: how do  these events compare to the art of fiction writing? Each one brings to its ‘doer’ an element of anticipation, exhilaration,
unfamiliarity, and adventure. A pure adrenaline rush. And as a writer of fiction, this is the plateau you want your reader to experience.

Straying from the anticipated ending to a twist makes for good reading, pleasing the editor, and upping your chance of getting accepted. But be wary. Your twist should conform along the lines of the story you have crafted thus far. Not an easy task to
accomplish, but plausible.


For example: fifteen-year-old John stole the answers to his exam from his teacher’s desk. Throughout the storyline, John has been portrayed as a ‘bully’ but every so often the writer has offered either flashbacks or little inconspicuous hints into John’s childhood. The reader assumes that John will either get away with it, or get caught and suspended. The author has gripped the reader into continuing the book to see where this will end up.
Here comes the twist.

Because of these rare flashback insights, we’ve seen another side to John, although subtle, it’s still there. So when John ends up placing the answers back with no one being the wiser,
the reader is stunned, surprised, but content with this twist ending because it has been subliminally build into the plot.

If the writer’s portrayal of John had been exclusively ‘bullish’, mean-spirited, unfriendly throughout then the reader’s reaction would have been stunned, surprised and
obviously, left cheated with an ending that holds no basis with the rest of the storyline.

This is called character reversal, when the character reacts different than what the reader expected. And to pull it off, you must have planted subtle seeds along the way.

Does this affect your plot down the line? In certain circumstances, yes. For example:

Bruce is a studious clean-cut senior high school student. He’s portrayed as the ‘geek’ for most of the story, not a main character at all. Then the writer decides to spruce things up
and throws a dare at Bruce. Bruce accepts. He takes his friend’s ID and goes to a ‘Rave’. Big mistake, but a twist for the reader. The ‘Rave’ is raided, Bruce ends up in jail because his friend is wanted by the police and he’s holding the fake id. He escapes and now tries to clear his name that somehow has crept into the police files. A sedate YA high school book has now turned into a suspense novel all because of a character
reversal.

Learn M ore  in our How to Write Series

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How to write op/ed

How to write a personal essay

How to write a press release

How to write a query

How to avoid common pitfalls

How to get published in the glossies

How to write believable characters

How to turn ideas into books

How to repair your short story

How to write creative fiction

How to find writing inspiration

How to avoid writers block

How to write a Holiday Tale

 

 

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When writing up your character(s) sketch, try to include opposite reactions, as well. By doing this, you can easily plot foreshadowing more convincingly ahead of the game.

Remember that fiction is often, if not all the time, crafted out of real people, real situations or real events. So think of a ‘real’ person and envision his reaction to several possible finales to a ‘dilemma’. Then start crafting the ending with one of these ‘reactions’ while dropping subtle hints to a totally different ending than what your reader is expecting. Try to use
this character reversal for a completely out of this world ‘awesome ending.’

Make sure your story propels forward, making your reader want to turn the page. Bungee jump them out of a plane into a secret path that will drive them to the finish line.

 



About the author:
Author’s Bio: Lea Schizas is Founder and Co-founder of 2 Writer’s Digest 101 Best Writing Sites of 2005
and recipients of the Preditors and Editors Award: Apollo’s Lyre and The MuseItUp Club. For more information on Lea Schizas, link here: http://leaschizasauthor.tripod.com